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Westerns

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Westerns

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1 Alter, Judy; Row, A. T. (editors) (Mary Hallock Foote; Willa Cather; Mari Sandoz; Dorothy Johnson; Gertrude Atherton; Mary Austin; Jeanne Williams; Carla Kelly; Marcia Muller; Bret Harte; O. Henry; Owen Wister; Elmore Leonard; Jack London; Jack Schaefer) UNBRIDLED SPIRITS
Fort Worth, Texas Texas Christian University Press 1994 0875651240 / 9780875651248 First Edition Paperback Very Good 8vo Tom Lovell; 
(xv) 365 pp. Trade paperback format. Light rubbing on the corners with a flat uncreased spine; no interior markings. The cover features Target Practice by Tom Lovell, courtesy of the National Cowboy Hall of Fame, Oklahoma City. Subtitled Short Fiction About Women in the Old West, this anthology contains: Introduction by Fred Erisman; The Pretty Girls of the West; The Fate of a Voice; and Maverick by Mary Hallock Foote; On the Art of Fiction; Eric Hermannson's Soul; and A Wagner Matinee by Willa Cather; Pioneer Women; Marlizzie; and Martha of the Yellow Braids by Mari Sandoz; Jack Schaefer's People; Flame on the Frontier; Journey to the Fort; and Lost Sister by Dorothy Johnson; The Wash Tub Mail by Gertrude Atherton; The Man Who Lied About a Woman by Mary Austin; The Debt by Jeanne Williams; Such Brave Men by Carla Kelly; Fool Girl by Judy Alter; Sweet Cactus Wine by Marcia Muller; Miggles by Bret Harte; Hearts and Crosses by O. Henry; Hank's Woman by Owen Wister; The Peace Maker by Charles Eastman; The Wit of Porportuk by Jack London; Kittura Remsburg by Jack Schaefer; The Last Indian Fight in Kerr County by Elmer Kenton; The Great Plain by Robert Flynn; and The Tonto Woman by Elmore Leonard. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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2 An Old Scout; Braddon, Paul YOUNG WILD WEST'S GREEN CORN DANCE or A Lively Time with the Pawnees - with - PAWNEE BILL or The White Chief's First War Trial
Derby, Connecticut Gold Star Books 1965 First Printing - First Thus Paperback Very Good- 
127 pp. Gold Star Book IL7-38. Edge and corner wear with some creasing on the spine; no interior markings. Both titles in a single volume: Young Wild West's Green Corn Dance from Wild West Weekly, December 9, 1904; and Pawnee Bill by Paul Braddon from the Wide Awake series. The Western as an actual genre started in the penny dreadfuls of the late 1800s, which later became the dime novels. Published in June 1860, Malaeska; the Indian Wife of the White Hunter is considered the first dime novel, though most of the dime novels romanticized the lives of real wild west characters from Wild Bill Hickock and Wyatt Earp to all the other famous and infamous people of the time, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, et cetera. When Zane Gray published Riders of the Purple Sage and when Clarence Mulford started his Hopalong Cassidy series, the Western became incredibly popular. And then the Western pulps started up in the 1920s, spawning such writers as Max Brand, Luke Short, Louis LíAmour and a host of others. And they thrived into the 1950s but were likely wiped out by television and the popular TV series of the time, such as Wanted Dead or Alive, Trackdown, Bonanza, Wagon Train, Have Gun Will Travel and many, many more. The Western isnít nearly as popular as it once was, but people still like the genre. New Westerns are published or filmed every year but the roots are still back in the pulps and the dime novels. 
Price: 8.75 CDN
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3 Anonymous SOMBRERO PETE
Racine, Wisconsin Whitman Books - Big Little Books 1936 First Edition Hardcover Good Only 24mo Hal Arbo; 
422 pp. Big Little Book 1136. Pictorial boards; illustrated with line drawings. General wear; no interior markings. Cover art and interior drawings by Hal Arbo. 
Price: 27.45 CDN
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4 Anonymous (editor) (Bill Jones; William R. Cox; Frank Bonham; Norman A. Fox; Dave Sands; Ralph C. Schoenfeld; Frank MacIntosh; Mark Martin; Tom W. Blackburn; Tom Roan) 10 STORY WESTERN - Volume 17, number 3 - May 1942
Toronto Popular Publications 1942 First Edition Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 4to 
96 pp. Light but general wear. This issue contains: Blood Oil and Bullets by Bill Jones; Ranch for the Dying by William R. Cox; Left Fork to Hell by Frank Bonham; Gunsmoke Trail to Peace by Norman A. Fox; The Hero of Blacksmith Bend by Dave Sands; Terror of the Rio Grande by Ralph C. Schoenfeld; Gun Whelp's Heritage by Frank MacIntosh; No Gun Law by Mark Martin; Gold Madness by Tom W. Blackburn; and Meat Hunger by Tom Roan. 
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5 Anonymous (editor) (Branch Carter; Tom Roan; William R. Cox; Tom W. Blackburn; T. C. McClary; Ray Gaulden; Edwin K. Sloat; Gunnison Steele; Lesley Madden; Quincy Williams; Joseph W. Quinn; Richard Grant; Howard C. Kegley; Chester B. Conant) 10 STORY WESTERN - Volume 21, number 29 - August 1945
Toronto Popular Publications 1945 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 4to 
96 pp. Light but general wear. This issue contains: Yellow Forks Doubles for Hell by Branch Carter; That Fightin'est Old Battleaxe by Tom Roan; Boomtown Trouble-shooter by William R. Cox; Juan Poker's White Flag by Tom W. Blackburn; Satan's Own Range by T. C. McClary; Fodder for the Owlhoot by Ray Gaulden; Powdersmoke Glory by Edwin K. Sloat; The Button Takes Over by Gunnison Steele; The Ha'nt with the Green Eyes by Lesley Madden; Gunsmoke Diet by Quincy Williams; Double Action Manhunt by Joseph W. Quinn; The People from Nowhere by Richard Grant; They Called 'em as They Saw 'em by Howard C. Kegley; and Riders of Empire by Chester B. Conant. The Western as an actual genre started in the penny dreadfuls of the late 1800s, which later became the dime novels. Published in June 1860, Malaeska; the Indian Wife of the White Hunter is considered the first dime novel, though most of the dime novels romanticized the lives of real wild west characters from Wild Bill Hickock and Wyatt Earp to all the other famous and infamous people of the time, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, et cetera. When Zane Gray published Riders of the Purple Sage and when Clarence Mulford started his Hopalong Cassidy series, the Western became incredibly popular. And then the Western pulps started up in the 1920s, spawning such writers as Max Brand, Luke Short, Louis L'Amour and a host of others. And they thrived into the 1950s but were likely wiped out by television and the popular TV series of the time, such as Wanted Dead or Alive, Trackdown, Bonanza, Wagon Train, Have Gun Will Travel and many, many more. The Western isn't nearly as popular as it once was, but people still like the genre. New Westerns are published or filmed every year but the roots are still back in the pulps and the dime novels. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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6 Anonymous (editor) (Frank Bonham; Tom Roan; Morgan Lewis; Bill Jones; M. Howard Lane; Tom W. Blackburn; Fred Gipson; Joe Austell Small; Gunnison Steele; Kenneth Fowler) 10 STORY WESTERN - Volume 19, number 1 - January 1943
Toronto Popular Publications 1943 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 4to 
96 pp. General wear with a short tear on the upper left of the front cover. This issue contains: Longhorns are Tough - a novel by Frank Bonham; Dynamite and Damnation - a novelette by Tom Roan; The Angle Iron Gun-cure - a novelette by Morgan Lewis; From Hell to Wichita by Bill Jones; One Against the Vigilantes by M. Howard Lane; Wagons West to Oblivion by Tom W. Blackburn; Some Hoss Thieves is Different by the author of Old Yeller, Fred Gipson; Donkey Man by Joe Austell Small; Beyond Boothill by Gunnison Steele; Cattle Kingdom for Two by Kenneth Fowler; and Canada Tomorrow by The Editor. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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7 Anonymous (editor) (Jackson Cole; Ben Frank; Barry Scobee; Captain Starr) TEXAS RANGERS - Volume 22, number 2 - March 1946
Toronto Publication Enterprises Limited 1946 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 8vo 
98 pp. General wear with a bit of a bend. This issue contains: The Empire Trail - a Jim Hatfield Ranger novel by Jackson Cole; Doc Swaps Fiddle Talk by Ben Frank; Things Happen in Threes by Barry Scobee; and The Frontier Post by Captain Starr. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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8 Anonymous (editor) (Jackson Cole; Chuck Mann; William Morrison; Lansing Stebbins; Hapsburg Liebe; Chad Wymont; Captain Starr) TEXAS RANGERS - Volume 16, number 1 - July 1943
Toronto American News Company 1943 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 8vo 
112 pp. General wear. This issue contains: Ghost Horseman - a Jim Hatfield Ranger novel by Jackson Cole; Bounty Hunter by Chuck Mann; Good Luck Jonah by William Morrison; Gun Hand by Lansing Stebbins; Stuckup Stickup by Hapsburg Liebe; Harvest for a Hawk by Chad Wymont; and The Frontier Post by Captain Starr. 
Price: 27.45 CDN
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9 Anonymous (editor) (M Howard Lane; Harry F. Olmsted; Art Lawson; Fremont Ward; Rolland Lynch; L. Ernenwein; John G. Pearsol; Jack Bloodhart; Miles Pierson; Gunnison Steele) 10 STORY WESTERN - Volume 18, number 1 - September 1942
Toronto Popular Publications 1942 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 4to 
96 pp. Light but general wear. This issue contains: Rebellion at Cavalry Creek by M. Howard Lane; Gunmen Pay in Blood by Harry F. Olmstead; Kansas Law for Texas Drovers by Art Lawson; Boothill's Election Extra by Fremont Ward; Death Names a Wagon Master by Rolland Lynch; Talk Fast or Die by L. Ernenwein; Range for the Damned by John G. Pearsol; The Hero Who Couldn't Quit by Jack Bloodhart; Ranger Drifter Grave Maker by Miles Pierson; Satan Picks a Saddlemate by Gunnison Steele; and West for the Spice of Life by The Editor. The Western as an actual genre started in the penny dreadfuls of the late 1800s, which later became the dime novels. Published in June 1860, Malaeska; the Indian Wife of the White Hunter is considered the first dime novel, though most of the dime novels romanticized the lives of real wild west characters from Wild Bill Hickock and Wyatt Earp to all the other famous and infamous people of the time, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, et cetera. When Zane Gray published Riders of the Purple Sage and when Clarence Mulford started his Hopalong Cassidy series, the Western became incredibly popular. And then the Western pulps started up in the 1920s, spawning such writers as Max Brand, Luke Short, Louis L'Amour and a host of others. And they thrived into the 1950s but were likely wiped out by television and the popular TV series of the time, such as Wanted Dead or Alive, Trackdown, Bonanza, Wagon Train, Have Gun Will Travel and many, many more. The Western isn't nearly as popular as it once was, but people still like the genre. New Westerns are published or filmed every year but the roots are still back in the pulps and the dime novels. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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10 Anonymous (editor) (Walt Coburn; Tom Roan; William R. Cox; Ralph Yergen; Charles D. Richardson; Gunnison Steele; M. Howard Lane; Dennison Rust; Morgan Lewis; William Benton Johnston) 10 STORY WESTERN - Volume 21, number 27 - June 1945
Toronto Popular Publications 1945 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 4to 
96 pp. General wear. This issue contains: Tinhorn King of Haunted Range - a complete novel by Walt Coburn; You Can't Kill a Buckskin Man - a novelette by Tom Road; The Boothill Rider - a novelette by William R. Cox; Windy Walton's Smoke Talk by Ralph Yergen; Owlhoot Holiday by Charles D. Richardson; Death at Silver Creek by Gunnison Steele; Buscadero Bait by M. Howard Lane; McCoy's Two-faced Luck by Dennison Rust; Trail by Blizzard by Morgan Lewis; and Mission in Mesa Grande by William Benton Johnson. 
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11 Anonymous (editor) (Walt Coburn; Tom W. Blackburn; William R. Cox; Joseph Chadwick; Art Lawson; Morgan Lewis; Marvim L. De Vries; John Beck; Joe Payne; Carl Broderick) 10 STORY WESTERN - Volume 21, number 25 - April 1945
Toronto Popular Publications 1945 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 4to 
96 pp. General wear. This issue contains: Phantom Scourge of Skull Valley by Walt Coburn; Derringer Diplomat by Tom W. Blackburn; Stop That Hellfire Texican by William R. Cox; Mail for the Hangman by Joseph Chadwick; Shotgun Gal by Art Lawson; Mantrap at Mud Creek by Morgan Lewis; War Hits Showdown Valley by Marvin L. De Vries; Mission for Villa by John Beck; Hero of Horsethief Basin by Joe Payne; Boothill Can Wait by Carl Broderick; and Code of the Trapper Clan by The Editor. The Western as an actual genre started in the penny dreadfuls of the late 1800s, which later became the dime novels. Published in June 1860, Malaeska; the Indian Wife of the White Hunter is considered the first dime novel, though most of the dime novels romanticized the lives of real wild west characters from Wild Bill Hickock and Wyatt Earp to all the other famous and infamous people of the time, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, et cetera. When Zane Gray published Riders of the Purple Sage and when Clarence Mulford started his Hopalong Cassidy series, the Western became incredibly popular. And then the Western pulps started up in the 1920s, spawning such writers as Max Brand, Luke Short, Louis L'Amour and a host of others. And they thrived into the 1950s but were likely wiped out by television and the popular TV series of the time, such as Wanted Dead or Alive, Trackdown, Bonanza, Wagon Train, Have Gun Will Travel and many, many more. The Western isn't nearly as popular as it once was, but people still like the genre. New Westerns are published or filmed every year but the roots are still back in the pulps and the dime novels. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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12 Anonymous. (editor) (Oscar Friend; Johnston McCulley; Larry Harris; Tom Gunn; Scott Carleton; Mel Pitzer; Alfred L. Garry; Doc Long Trail) POPULAR WESTERN - Volume 30, number 1 - January Jan 1946
Toronto Publication Enterprises Limited 1945 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 4to 
98 pp. Light but general wear. This issue contains: Doves of Peace by Oscar Friend; Puma Joe Starts a New Year by Johnson McCulley; The Town Tamers by Larry Harris; The Border Brute by Tom Gunn; Rebellion at Mescalero by Scott Carleton; Sodbusters Don't Scare by Mel Pitzer; Ham Chalks Up a Victory by Alfred L. Garry; and The Home Corral by Doc Long Trail. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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13 Anonymous. (editor) (Scott Carleton; Tom Gunn; William L. Hopson; Joe Archibald; Dean Owen; Hapsburg Liebe; David Lavender; Johnston McCulley; Lansing Stebbins; Old Doc Trail) POPULAR WESTERN - Volume 23, number 1 - January 1943
Toronto Publication Enterprises Limited 1943 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 4to 
112 pp. Light but general wear. This issue contains: The Scarlet Scalp by Scott Carleton; Wagonwheel War by Tom Gunn; The Return of the Outlaw by William L. Hopson; Trail's End to Paradise by Joe Archibald; Rope Justice by Dean Owen; Lobo Law by Hapsburg Liebe; Bull Trail to Treachery by David Lavender; Hot Hardware by Johnston McCulley; Gold Eagle Trail by Lansing Stebbins; and The Home Corral by Doc Long Trail. The Western as an actual genre started in the penny dreadfuls of the late 1800s, which later became the dime novels. Published in June 1860, Malaeska; the Indian Wife of the White Hunter is considered the first dime novel, though most of the dime novels romanticized the lives of real wild west characters from Wild Bill Hickock and Wyatt Earp to all the other famous and infamous people of the time, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, et cetera. When Zane Gray published Riders of the Purple Sage and when Clarence Mulford started his Hopalong Cassidy series, the Western became incredibly popular. And then the Western pulps started up in the 1920s, spawning such writers as Max Brand, Luke Short, Louis L'Amour and a host of others. And they thrived into the 1950s but were likely wiped out by television and the popular TV series of the time, such as Wanted Dead or Alive, Trackdown, Bonanza, Wagon Train, Have Gun Will Travel and many, many more. The Western isn't nearly as popular as it once was, but people still like the genre. New Westerns are published or filmed every year but the roots are still back in the pulps and the dime novels. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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14 Anonymous. (editor) (Eli Colter; Verne Chute; J. E. Grinstead; Edwin K. Sloat; John G. Pearsol; Norman A. Fox; Cliff M. Bisbee) NEW WESTERN - Volume 5, number 3 - February 1943
Toronto Popular Publications 1943 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 
96 pp. General wear. This issue contains: The Jeppsons Ride to War - a novel by Eli Colter; Dead Man's Roundup - a novelette by Verne Chute; Wipe-out on Horse Creek Range - a novelette by J. E. Grinstead; Nesters Never Learn by Edwin K. Sloat; Law Badges for the Damned by John G. Pearsol; The Windmill of Damnation by Norman A. Fox; Fighters Know How to Die by Cliff M. Bisbee; and Out Trail Caravan by The Editor. The Western as an actual genre started in the penny dreadfuls of the late 1800s, which later became the dime novels. Published in June 1860, Malaeska; the Indian Wife of the White Hunter is considered the first dime novel, though most of the dime novels romanticized the lives of real wild west characters from Wild Bill Hickock and Wyatt Earp to all the other famous and infamous people of the time, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, et cetera. When Zane Gray published Riders of the Purple Sage and when Clarence Mulford started his Hopalong Cassidy series, the Western became incredibly popular. And then the Western pulps started up in the 1920s, spawning such writers as Max Brand, Luke Short, Louis L'Amour and a host of others. And they thrived into the 1950s but were likely wiped out by television and the popular TV series of the time, such as Wanted Dead or Alive, Trackdown, Bonanza, Wagon Train, Have Gun Will Travel and many, many more. The Western isn't nearly as popular as it once was, but people still like the genre. New Westerns are published or filmed every year but the roots are still back in the pulps and the dime novels. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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15 Anonymous. (editor) (Frank Bonham; William R. Cox; Harry F. Olmstead; Tom Roan; Fred Gipson; Bart Cassidy; Philip Ketchum) DIME WESTERN - Volume 33, number 6 - January 1943
Toronto Popular Publications 1943 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 8vo 
96 pp. Light but general wear. This issue contains: Not for Gold and Glory - a complete novel by Frank Bonham; King of the River Gamblers - a complete novel by William R. Cox; Ghost Legion of the Diablos - a novelette by Harry F. Olmsted; Feudists of the Frozen North by Tom Roan; A Damn Bad Man by Fred Gipson - the author of Old Yeller; Sixgun Sentence for Tensleep by Bart Cassidy; and Big Timber Hate by Philip Ketchum. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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16 Anonymous. (editor) (Johnston McCulley; George Owen Baxter; Arthur Preston Hankins; Edward Leonard; Frederick Hemming; Harry Golden; Emerson Hough; Ray Humphreys; Thomas R. Best) WESTERN STORY - Volume 34, number 4 - May 5, 1923
New York Street and Smith 1923 First Edition Soft Cover Very Good- Pulp Magazine 8vo 
144 pp. followed by an advertising section. Edge and corner wear with some creasing on the spine and scuffing on the front cover. This issue contains: Two Softies in Sunland - a novel by Johnston McCulley; short stories: Switched Ponies by Edward Leonard; The Pup that Paid by Frederick Hemming; Without a Tinkle by Harry Golden; Curly's Coon by Emerson Hough; Saddle Your Own by Ray Humphreys; and How the West Was Won - The Greatest Tragedy of the Overland Trail - an article by Thomas R. Best; The Bandit of Black Hills - part two of a six part story by George Owen Baxter (Max Brand - Frederick Schiller Faust); and The Wagon Boss - part six of a seven part story by Arthur Preston Hankins; along with an assortment of features and departments. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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17 Anonymous. (editor) (Kenneth Fowler; Brad Buckner; Ed Earl Repp; John G. Pearsol; Dave Sands; Leroy Boyd; Raymond Murphy) BIG BOOK WESTERN - Volume 10, number 2 - May 1942
Toronto Popular Publications 1942 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 8vo 
96 pp. Light but general wear. This issue contains: The Fight for Purgatory Dam - a novel by Kenneth Fowler; Lost Battalion of Moccasin Swamp - a novel by Brad Buckner; Wires West - to Death by Ed Earl Repp; Turncoat from Boothill by John G. Pearsol; Coward by Proxy by Dave Sands; Tenderfoot's Judgment Day by Leroy Boyd; and The Scalp that Ran Away by Raymond Murphy. 
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18 Anonymous. (editor) (L. P. Holmes; Barry Cord; Dean Owen; Wayne D. Overholser; Joe Austell Small; Scott F. Wimberly; Ralph Berard) NEW WESTERN - Volume 9, number 8 - September 1945
Toronto Popular Publications 1945 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 4to 
96 pp. General wear. This issue contains: Ride Home to Hell by L. P. Holmes; The Devil Sends a Gunman by Barry Cord; Red Rock's One Man Rebellion by Dean Owen; Greenhorn's Gun Guardians by Wayne D. Overholser; Say It with Bullets by Joe Austell Small; Buttons Buys a Town by Scott F. Wimberly; and New Start - in Boothill by Ralph Berard. The Western as an actual genre started in the penny dreadfuls of the late 1800s, which later became the dime novels. Published in June 1860, Malaeska; the Indian Wife of the White Hunter is considered the first dime novel, though most of the dime novels romanticized the lives of real wild west characters from Wild Bill Hickock and Wyatt Earp to all the other famous and infamous people of the time, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, et cetera. When Zane Gray published Riders of the Purple Sage and when Clarence Mulford started his Hopalong Cassidy series, the Western became incredibly popular. And then the Western pulps started up in the 1920s, spawning such writers as Max Brand, Luke Short, Louis L'Amour and a host of others. And they thrived into the 1950s but were likely wiped out by television and the popular TV series of the time, such as Wanted Dead or Alive, Trackdown, Bonanza, Wagon Train, Have Gun Will Travel and many, many more. The Western isn't nearly as popular as it once was, but people still like the genre. New Westerns are published or filmed every year but the roots are still back in the pulps and the dime novels. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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19 Anonymous. (editor) (LeRoy Boyd; Ruel McDaniel; Curtis Bishop; Gunnison Steele; Morgan Lewis; Ross Rocklynne; Jim Kjelgaard; Ben T. Young; Lee E. Wells; A. Kenneth Brent; Dan Kirby) NEW WESTERN - Volume 6, number 7 - December 1943
Toronto Popular Publications 1943 First Printing - First Thus Soft Cover Very Good Pulp Magazine 4to 
96 pp. General wear. This issue contains: Westward to Blood and Glory by LeRoy Boyd; Furlough from the Dark Trails by Ruel McDaniel and Curtis Bishop; Blood Sweat and Bullwhips by Gunnison Steele; Hangnoose Substitute by Morgan Lewis; Telecote's Owlhoot Tutor by Ross Rocklynne; Dead Man's Dogs by Jim Kjelgaard; Blizzard Maverick by Ben T. Young; Steel to Painted Post by Lee E. Wells; and Chained to Glory by A. Kenneth Brent and Dan Kirby. The Western as an actual genre started in the penny dreadfuls of the late 1800s, which later became the dime novels. Published in June 1860, Malaeska; the Indian Wife of the White Hunter is considered the first dime novel, though most of the dime novels romanticized the lives of real wild west characters from Wild Bill Hickock and Wyatt Earp to all the other famous and infamous people of the time, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, et cetera. When Zane Gray published Riders of the Purple Sage and when Clarence Mulford started his Hopalong Cassidy series, the Western became incredibly popular. And then the Western pulps started up in the 1920s, spawning such writers as Max Brand, Luke Short, Louis L'Amour and a host of others. And they thrived into the 1950s but were likely wiped out by television and the popular TV series of the time, such as Wanted Dead or Alive, Trackdown, Bonanza, Wagon Train, Have Gun Will Travel and many, many more. The Western isn't nearly as popular as it once was, but people still like the genre. New Westerns are published or filmed every year but the roots are still back in the pulps and the dime novels. 
Price: 21.95 CDN
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20 Anonymous. (editor) (Range Rider; George Gilbert; Charles Wesley Sanders; Robert J. Horton; Frank Richardson Pierce; Roy W. Hinds; Robert Ormond Case; Thomas R. Best) WESTERN STORY - Volume 31, number 6 - January 20, 1923
New York Street and Smith 1923 First Edition Soft Cover Very Good- Pulp Magazine 8vo 
144 pp. Edge and corner wear with some creasing on the spine. This issue contains: Circle D Borrows an Owner - a novel by Range Rider; Three Sons from Bar O X - part one of seven by George Gilbert; Hill Bred Barton's Code - part two of five by Charles Wesley Sanders; Short Stories: New Hope by Robert J. Horton; Bingo Pays His Way by Frank Richardson Pierce; Printed with Wool by Roy W. Hinds; Little Songhee's Big Trouble by Robert Ormond Case; and From Spokane to Puget Sound - an article by Thomas R. Best; along with an assortment of features and departments. 
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